The MFA vs NYC launch is coming up on Tuesday. I’ll be reading from my essay about how I spent several years aggressively ruining every aspect of my life/writing this book. TEAM NYC! 

The MFA vs NYC launch is coming up on Tuesday. I’ll be reading from my essay about how I spent several years aggressively ruining every aspect of my life/writing this book. TEAM NYC! 

"Actually it’s like being one of those people who put a photo up on eBay of some stupid furniture and then everyone figures out they can see you in some reflection and you’re REALLY NAKED AND NOT PRETTY."

Choire Sicha on exactly what publishing a book is like. 

jennirl:

this made me sigh heavily, and i thought maybe it was worth addressing. i’ll skip the obvious part about “basic human right” and go straight to why a local bookshop can’t possibly stock all local authors:
there may literally not be enough space! many local shops are small, and have to make every single book on their shelves count. 
making every book count means making sure that they are stocking topics and authors that appeal to their clientele. while you are, of course, very interested in your book, that doesn’t necessarily mean that your local bookshop’s average customer is. 
which leads me to, trusting local buyers. no bookstore DOESN’T want to make money. no bookstore in the world is intentionally turning down a potential bestseller, be it local or national. every bookstore in the world wants to stock awesome books. they read sales reports, they read trades, they labor over catalogs, they stay up at night worrying about their bottom line. they read EVERYTHING THEY CAN. i have worked for five of them, believe me — this is absolutely true.
so if your local passes on your book, it’s because they genuinely believe that that book will not work for their shop. stocking a book just to stock it means that the bookstore makes less money, the book doesn’t move, and then everyone is sad except for that initial five minutes in which the author is happy to see it on the shelf. that’s not a recipe for success, that’s a recipe for frustration. 
also frustrating: facing the intense indignation of local authors when you try to explain to them why you won’t be stocking their book.

Jenn ftw, with a caveat about infinite sympathy for authors in the throes of pub-date-induced psychosis, which should be in the DSM-IV

jennirl:

this made me sigh heavily, and i thought maybe it was worth addressing. i’ll skip the obvious part about “basic human right” and go straight to why a local bookshop can’t possibly stock all local authors:

  • there may literally not be enough space! many local shops are small, and have to make every single book on their shelves count. 
  • making every book count means making sure that they are stocking topics and authors that appeal to their clientele. while you are, of course, very interested in your book, that doesn’t necessarily mean that your local bookshop’s average customer is. 
  • which leads me to, trusting local buyers. no bookstore DOESN’T want to make money. no bookstore in the world is intentionally turning down a potential bestseller, be it local or national. every bookstore in the world wants to stock awesome books. they read sales reports, they read trades, they labor over catalogs, they stay up at night worrying about their bottom line. they read EVERYTHING THEY CAN. i have worked for five of them, believe me — this is absolutely true.

so if your local passes on your book, it’s because they genuinely believe that that book will not work for their shop. stocking a book just to stock it means that the bookstore makes less money, the book doesn’t move, and then everyone is sad except for that initial five minutes in which the author is happy to see it on the shelf. that’s not a recipe for success, that’s a recipe for frustration. 

also frustrating: facing the intense indignation of local authors when you try to explain to them why you won’t be stocking their book.

Jenn ftw, with a caveat about infinite sympathy for authors in the throes of pub-date-induced psychosis, which should be in the DSM-IV

Tags: books

more Empathy by Sarah Schulman

more Empathy by Sarah Schulman

wordbrooklyn:

Today is a day of celebration — our birthday! And you all know what that means…WE NEED HELP EATING DELICIOUS DONUTS!!!

I feel emo about WORD on its anniversary. When it first opened I was living on Greenpoint Avenue. I remember walking in and asking Christine to please stock my book Hex Education. She was very polite about it! Six years is simultaneously not very long and a lifetime ago. I’m guessing it feels that way to WORD, too.  Congratulations to my favorite bookstore on surviving and thriving as a neighborhood and an industry have changed around them, for better and worse. I am excited about what the next 6 years will bring. 

wordbrooklyn:

Today is a day of celebration — our birthday! And you all know what that means…WE NEED HELP EATING DELICIOUS DONUTS!!!

I feel emo about WORD on its anniversary. When it first opened I was living on Greenpoint Avenue. I remember walking in and asking Christine to please stock my book Hex Education. She was very polite about it! Six years is simultaneously not very long and a lifetime ago. I’m guessing it feels that way to WORD, too.  Congratulations to my favorite bookstore on surviving and thriving as a neighborhood and an industry have changed around them, for better and worse. I am excited about what the next 6 years will bring. 

(Source: wordbookstores)

Tags: word books

"It’s impossible to overstate how much reviewers hated MacLane and how deeply they held her in contempt, citing her “vulgarity” and calling her book “a revelation of self which is not interesting or sympathetic.” Their insistence on calling her “boring” quickly begins to seem absurd: if she was so boring, why were they so obsessed? Critics also insisted that she was doing the world a disservice by getting attention that they (disingenuously) declared ought to be granted to presumably worthier writers: “Think of the hundreds of poor lonesome girls working away at the making of literature who cannot get their literature printed and published.” When asked to explain MacLane’s popularity, they mostly just threw up their hands in befuddlement: “People go wild over young girls writing slush about themselves,” the author of a MacLane parody “explained” in 1902."

Intrigued? Next Wednesday, Kara Jesella and Normandy Sherwood and I discuss Mary MacLane at BookCourt. Come! 

From a 1903 New York Times review of one of Mary MacLane’s books. “A revelation of self which is not interesting or sympathetic.”
Come hear me, Kara Jesella and Normandy Sherwood discuss Mary’s books, newly republished, and her legacy at BookCourt on 3/20. 

From a 1903 New York Times review of one of Mary MacLane’s books. “A revelation of self which is not interesting or sympathetic.”

Come hear me, Kara Jesella and Normandy Sherwood discuss Mary’s books, newly republished, and her legacy at BookCourt on 3/20

The Facades was announced as a BEA buzz pick today, ie it’s a big deal. I was intrigued because it’s being published by Overlook, so I googled it. This is the Amazon description for it. I thought it was dummy text but it turns out The Carp Castle is a real book, so this must just be some Amazon glitch. This seemed funnier to me for the minute I spent convinced that the description of The Carp Castle and all the quotes about “MacDonald Harris” including "a gifted craftsman, a meticulous writer whose powers as a storyteller are as compelling as the sexual tensions he imagines" were some bored assistant’s joke, or maybe a meta prank that’s part of a guerilla marketing scheme that relates somehow the plot of The Facades, a novel which I still know nothing about. 

The Facades was announced as a BEA buzz pick today, ie it’s a big deal. I was intrigued because it’s being published by Overlook, so I googled it. This is the Amazon description for it. I thought it was dummy text but it turns out The Carp Castle is a real book, so this must just be some Amazon glitch. This seemed funnier to me for the minute I spent convinced that the description of The Carp Castle and all the quotes about “MacDonald Harris” including "a gifted craftsman, a meticulous writer whose powers as a storyteller are as compelling as the sexual tensions he imagines" were some bored assistant’s joke, or maybe a meta prank that’s part of a guerilla marketing scheme that relates somehow the plot of The Facades, a novel which I still know nothing about. 

Tags: books

Every Book Elanor Mentioned Reading In Her Featured Subscriber Interview

Elanor reads a lot of books.  These links are to Goodreads and to Emily Books where appropriate.

Sexual Politics by Kate Millett

Villette by Charlotte Brontë

Jane Eyre by  Charlotte Brontë

How To Suppress Women’s Writing by Joanna Russ

The Loony-Bin Trip by Kate Millett

Asylums by Erving Goffman

Airless Spaces by Shulamith Firestone

 Promising Young Women by Suzanne Scanlon (buy it here)

The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life by Erving Goffman

Plainwater by Anne Carson

Decreation by Anne Carson

The Beauty Of The Husband by Anne Carson

Glass, Irony and God by Anne Carson

Autobiography of Red by Anne Carson

The Lottery and Other Stories by Shirley Jackson

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

We Have Always Lived In The Castle by Shirley Jackson

Hangsaman by Shirley Jackson

Mercury by Ariana Reines (buy)

the buddhist by Dodie Bellamy (buy

I’m Trying To Reach You by Barbara Browning (buy

Capital by Karl Marx

 

emilybooks:

Elanor: I usually read a few books at the same time. I like to have books on my bed and books on my phone. Right now I just finished a bunch of books, so I am at the start of a few new books but I haven’t really settled into any of them yet. These books I guess are part of other chains of books, so I’m going to talk about that, because books lead to books lead to books, etc.

Elanor McInerney is our first featured subscriber. She lives in Melbourne, Australia, where it is already tomorrow right now.  And she is not kidding about chains of books. She listed 26 books she’d recently read in this short interview. 

Tags: lit books whoa