This onion marmalade and goat cheese omelet was the first of what I’m  sure will be many things I’ll cook with Lukas’s new cookbook,  Vegetarian Entrees That Won’t Leave You Hungry.  I love the way Lukas  thinks about food. Unlike so many cookbook writers, he understands that  the last thing you need is a recipe that ensures you’ll have a jar of  some spice blend that’s all but 1/2 a teaspoon full sitting in your  cupboard for years until you move to a new apartment. His recipes are  always based on what’s fresh and affordable, cooked in inventive ways  that are still familiar enough that you’ll think “yeah, I could do that!  I already have half that stuff!”  His descriptions of techniques are so  clear.  He inspires me to not just lazily make the same twelve-fifteen  dinners I know by heart over and over again, and to bring that little  bit of finesse to cooking that’s the difference between a tempting  dinner and a platter of tofu slop.
Also if this book didn’t have “Vegetarian” in big letters on its cover I bet you wouldn’t even notice it’s vegetarian.
Making  an omelet for yourself at the end of a long day is really nice (as long  as you know how to make an omelet, which prior to reading Lukas’s book I  actually did not.  He has a great ‘covering the pan and taking it off  the heat and letting it sit 3 minutes’ trick that helps prevent dread gooey raw egg middle and rubbery  outside omelet disease.) I felt like Ruth Reichl in that part of  Comfort Me With Apples (right?) where she follows a lover (!) to France  and ends up in her friend’s apartment, jetlagged and unsure of herself,  with nothing in the fridge but an old cheese, stale bread, some pears  (?) and some eggs.  She makes herself a “good french omelet” and makes  the bread into crackers and feels generally self-sufficient and ready to take on the world.

This onion marmalade and goat cheese omelet was the first of what I’m sure will be many things I’ll cook with Lukas’s new cookbook, Vegetarian Entrees That Won’t Leave You Hungry.  I love the way Lukas thinks about food. Unlike so many cookbook writers, he understands that the last thing you need is a recipe that ensures you’ll have a jar of some spice blend that’s all but 1/2 a teaspoon full sitting in your cupboard for years until you move to a new apartment. His recipes are always based on what’s fresh and affordable, cooked in inventive ways that are still familiar enough that you’ll think “yeah, I could do that! I already have half that stuff!”  His descriptions of techniques are so clear.  He inspires me to not just lazily make the same twelve-fifteen dinners I know by heart over and over again, and to bring that little bit of finesse to cooking that’s the difference between a tempting dinner and a platter of tofu slop.

Also if this book didn’t have “Vegetarian” in big letters on its cover I bet you wouldn’t even notice it’s vegetarian.

Making an omelet for yourself at the end of a long day is really nice (as long as you know how to make an omelet, which prior to reading Lukas’s book I actually did not.  He has a great ‘covering the pan and taking it off the heat and letting it sit 3 minutes’ trick that helps prevent dread gooey raw egg middle and rubbery outside omelet disease.) I felt like Ruth Reichl in that part of Comfort Me With Apples (right?) where she follows a lover (!) to France and ends up in her friend’s apartment, jetlagged and unsure of herself, with nothing in the fridge but an old cheese, stale bread, some pears (?) and some eggs.  She makes herself a “good french omelet” and makes the bread into crackers and feels generally self-sufficient and ready to take on the world.

  1. meechew reblogged this from emilygould and added:
    Lovely…
  2. theapartmentchronicles said: Your cat is so cute! And the omelet looks beautiful.
  3. thanksforsharing said: Wow, thank you! And that really looks delicious right now.
  4. emilygould posted this